Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Why You Should Turn Down That Well-Paying Job

I remember being young and broke, going to an interview for an internal auditor job at a bank. The bankers who interviewed me were enthusiastic; they were authentic bankers. I did my best to pose as a banker, but as often happens to posers I was found out. The bankers asked me for a “writing sample.” I showed them my poetry. It was not to be.

Some people become accountants because they want a secure job. There is much to be said for pragmatism; better to be an employed accountant than a wanna-be actor. But is that the right comparison? Here is the issue: Somewhere tonight, maybe around 3 AM, some guy will be laying awake thinking about accounting. He lives and breathes accounting; it occupies his thinking even in his spare time. If things get competitive for accountants, he is going to dominate. His rivals are acting like accountants; he is the real thing.

Competitive advantage goes to the authentic. Their job is their avocation. They would do it, if need be, without pay. The authentic persist at getting through the tough parts of their vocation. They ponder it during the quiet times, so the magic of insight makes their work more creative. The gardener out on a cold morning; the writer typing away when she should be sleeping. Such people will take their vocation as far as it can be taken. By contrast, those who merely pose will not. As in the old adage “you cannot coach passion,” no amount of posturing can outdo authentic dedication.

The practical reader is objecting at this point, noting that there is a big economic difference between being an authentic accountant and an authentic writer. This contrast brings to mind a corollary adage: “Every person has a special gift.” As each of us grew up, we searched for that gift – the activity that seemed authentic to us. Our parents hoped that it might also be an activity that pays. How fortunate is the authentic accountant! His passion lines up well with economic gain. Meanwhile there goes the authentic musician, waiting on the accountant as he dines. Don’t get me wrong; I love the arts and admire the authentic artists. But though all of us may have a gift, some gifts pay better than others.


Does this mean that only some of us can follow our calling? That depends on how long we search. My failed attempt to be a banker left me broke still, but the upside was that I kept searching. Life is a “sequential search” process. We search, one by one, trying to match our gifts with the opportunities of the world. When we settle on an occupation, we also stop our search. If we stop the search at the first pragmatic job, then we are posing - and will surely be out-competed by the authentic. But if we keep searching, we increase the chances of matching our gifts with opportunity. Of course not all jobs pay the same. But better to keep searching for a way to remain authentic, than to settle early for mediocrity. Search enables authenticity.

The lesson: Ask “what do you do well?” and then search to see how that ability fits the opportunities of the world. You will have failures along the way if your search is thorough. But the upside of each failure is that you'll be required to keep searching, again increasing your chances of finding a match between your passion and the opportunities of the world.

More dangerous than failure is that you might, early on, score a well-paying job for which you are not authentic. Turn it down. Search enables authenticity.


For an academic treatment of the sequential search strategy, see Levinthal and March’s paper.