Wednesday, January 31, 2018

What Makes You Unique?

I recall a few years ago one of the kids came home from elementary school with a paper "award" that looked like this:

That afternoon, the school playground was littered with these things. Apparently the school had copied hundreds of the identical awards. Just fill in your child's name, and you have mass customization.

I got to thinking about the problem of uniqueness yesterday. I had breakfast at Baji's, but forgot my earbuds. So I was forced to listen to the guru bellowing wisdom at the next table, mansplaining to his "client" how to succeed as an entrepreneur: "...you need to have barriers to entry...bla bla bla...all about execution...bla bla bla...focus on your capabilities...bla bla bla...just like at Google...bla bla bla..."

Putting aside the superficial content, the most remarkable thing about the "conversation" is that I never once heard the entrepreneur speak. Not one single word - from when I ordered coffee to when I paid the check. So the guru thinks that his wisdom is right, regardless of what business he is talking about. Just follow his recipe, and success is yours - no matter who you are, what you do, what you're good at, or what challenges you face.

But we know from research (and experience) that there are many roads to success, each unique in some way. Research identifies this as the problem of "competitive heterogeneity," where companies differ in unique ways that lead to very different outcomes. In practice, if you listen (really listen) to people at work, you may come to see possibilities for success that apply to them because of their unique circumstances, their unique abilities, and their unique shortcomings. Of course, this means actions that might help one company to succeed may well fail for another. A sobering fact if you're a guru peddling a recipe.

Caution: Don't now conclude that generalizations cannot be true or useful. Research has taught us many useful generalizations about business success. For instance, we know that delegation and empowerment increases employee involvement and creativity. But like all generalizations, putting such an idea into practice brings in many other variables that can change what happens. Delegation that works for a creative video game studio in Chicago may not work well in a Mexican brewery or in a German automobile factory. In short, whether a generalization holds true in practice depends on the unique circumstances of the company in question.

Knowing generalizations about business is not enough. To succeed, you must also know when to apply your general knowledge in the right, specific circumstances. Know what makes your company unique. Only then can you begin to find your own, unique, path to success.


The problem of "competitive heterogeneity" is the subject of considerable research, including my book on The Red Queen.